Creating a new site node / page

When you want to create or extend your site you often want to create new pages in it. In InfoGlue this is done by adding a new “Site Node” which is very much the same as a Webpage. A Site Node can contain any number of other site nodes so you can create your own hierarchies any way you want. To create a new site node you must first select where to put it. You do this by clicking on the site node you wish to put it beneath.

For example – if I want to put a new site node beneath the first page in the officestand2 structure repository you mark the node in the left navigation:

The menu above the main area will now change and reveal the functional buttons available for this site node. Now click on the “New Site Node”-button and you will be asked to enter a site node name.

In the create screen you will also have to choose which type of page this will be. The types of pages available are defined by the administrator and basically mean it is possible to handle a user request to a page in very different ways and that the things possible to specify for that page is defined for each type.

For basic users I would recommend you get a guide from the development team of which type to use for which pages. The suggested way in 1.3 is to use component-based pages but it’s really up to you.

A feature in InfoGlue is the ability to save pages as template pages. This means that the new site node will be a copy of the template site node when it comes to which components it has etc. As you can see I have created such a template and made a image which shows it’s characteristics. The user who wants to use such a page template just marks it. In a clean installation no such thumbnails swill be shown.

When you know which type you want to use - enter a name, edit publish/unpublish dates, chose site node type, choose page template if you want to and click the “Save”-button. You will now see the created page with the properties available on it. I have chosen a “ComponentPage”-type for this example but not chosen any page template as we want to demonstrate other aspects as well.

 

The site node view contains the following properties:

  1. Site Node name: The internal name of the page/site node. Just for internal navigation purpose.
  2. Publish date. You state when the page should be published. You are able to set the date to a future date and then the page will not be visible until that date. To change the date you click on the calendar symbol. Default the publish date is set to today’s date. The calendar is quite easy to understand.
  3. Expire date: these fields let you specify when the page should be unpublished automatically. The page will be removed from the site at that date. Default, the expire date is set to 10 years ahead.
  4. Content type: This field let’s you specify in which content type we send data to the browser requesting the page. This is normally not changed unless you have a very particular need or you are a developer doing css or JavaScript pages.
  5. Page Cache Timeout (advanced): This field let’s you have a page cache timeout on this page.
  6. Current state: This is the state switch you can use when you want to propagate the working copy up to the publishing mode. Read more about the publishing process in that chapter.
  7. Protect page: This lets you state that the current page should be protected on the site through the built in extranet solution within InfoGlue. The property can have 3 different states.
    1. No – means that the page is definitely not protected.
    2. Yes – means that the page is protected and that only those roles defined under the page “Access rights”-button are allowed to access it.
    3. Inherited – this means that we want to use the same settings for this property as the parent node has. So if the parent node is protected this will also be protected. This is the default setting.
  8. Disable page cache: This means that you can choose to turn of the page caching for a page. The page caching is used to get the best response-times as possible for a site and should only be turned of in cases where the content is really dynamic on the page in question or if integration towards other systems is done. The property can have 3 different states.
    1. No – means that the page-cache is not turned of.
    2. Yes – means that the page-cache is turned off.
    3. Inherited – this means that we want to use the same settings for this property as the parent node has. So if the parent nodes cache is turned off this will also be. This is the default setting and means in most cases that the page-cache is on.
  9. Disable edit on sight: As described in a later chapter there is a function called “Edit on sight” in InfoGlue. As the edit on sight decorates the HTML output in the structure view of the site (i.e. it adds special tags) it can in some cases mess up the templates if they are very special. If that happens and you don’t want to use the edit on sight functionality on that page you can turn it off. The property can have 3 different states.
    1. No – means that the functionality is not turned of.
    2. Yes – means that the functionality is turned off for this page.
    3. Inherited – this means that we want to use the same settings for this property as the parent node has. So if the parent nodes “Edit-On-Sight” is turned off this one’s will also be. This is the default setting and means in most cases that the functionality is turned on.
  10. Disable languages: You can state that a page does not support a certain language.
    1. No – means that all the sites languages are available on this page.
    2. Yes – means that those languages not marked as disables or marked as enabled (will only be visible when yes) are not available to the user on that page.
    3. Inherited – this means that we want to use the same settings for this property as the parent node has.
  11. Disable forced identity check (SSO): You can state that a CAS lookup should not be forced on unprotected page.
    1. No – means that CAS is always called when reaching this page as an anonymous user.
    2. Yes – means that CAS is not called if the page is not protected.
    3. Inherited – this means that we want to use the same settings for this property as the parent node has.
  12. In InfoGlue there is an area showing contents and pages referencing this page just like in the content tool. This is a great help when looking to delete or move information.

 

  1. The binding area: A page/site Node can have bindings which are basically a way for the users to specify global information resources for the page. You can assign templates and articles and navigational aspects this way. What bindings you are able to set are defined by the administrator in the management tool. My ComponentPage-type had none but here is how a different page type could look:

    There are two kinds of bindings available at the moment. On the left side you see the content bindings. A content binding gives you a way to specify what information to show on the page. On the right side you have the structural bindings. Those give you a way of defining relations to other pages within the site. A good example is defining what pages should be part of the page navigation etc.

    To assign a binding of either sort you click on the name of the binding and follow the guide that follows. You should get a guide from your developer/administrator which explains the bindings your specific site has and what effect they will have on the page.